Healthy hips are here to stay

By Megan Storey | March 25, 2019

April is here, and with that comes Healthy Hips week (1-7 April), so we thought we’d write a blog about some of the common hip issues we regularly see in clinic, so you can ensure your hips stay healthy, and keep your body moving for longer.

Woman with hip painThe hip is a pretty complex joint, with numerous muscles, tendons, ligaments and other tissues attaching in and around it to provide support and movement. Because there are so many structures, it means there are lots of possibilities for things to go wrong. And therefore, lots of potential sources of pain when something does go wrong. Fortunately for us clinicians, the common things are common, and the rare things are, well, rare! This helps us to work out quickly what’s going on, so we can put you on the road to recovery.

Do I need a scan?

One common issue we are faced with in clinic, is that our patients will often come to us having seen their GP, following a scan on their hip, and have been told that they have ‘bursitis’ or ‘arthritis’, and this is what is causing their pain. This can be a little problematic for everyone sometimes, for a few reasons. Firstly, many people that have reports that suggest bursitis, or hip osteoarthritis, do not even have pain from that condition – sometimes these findings are simply incidental and have no bearing on our patient’s issues… Secondly, it plants a seed. What we mean by this is that people tend to trust what they see. So, if they see suggestions of bursitis, or arthritis, they suddenly start to believe that this is what must be the cause of their pain, rather than something else (like muscular weakness). Getting the patient to understand that their scan’s diagnosis may not be the cause of their pain (if it is indeed not the cause of their pain) is part of our job as educators of the body, and this can sometimes be difficult!

Common causes of hip pain

In our experience, the most common cause for hip issues in our clinic is muscular imbalance and gluteal weakness. Muscle imbalances are very common throughout the body, throughout the population. We all live different lives, playing different sports, having different hobbies and working different jobs. Look at an example of a desk worker who sits for their job, plays tennis left-handed, and is a keen candy-crush game addict. It’s easy to see over time how their body might develop muscular imbalance from favouring certain positions and sides of the body over long periods of time. Our bodies are rarely 100% symmetrical and can adapt extremely well, but there is always a point where it can no longer keep adapting. This is generally when you start to feel pain. Your body is telling you to do something about it. And this is where we come in!

Weak gluteal muscles are a really common problem for the general population. Why you ask? It’s because a large amount of people now sit more than move. People are more sedentary than ever. Technology is advancing and feeding our need for constant entertainment. And you can actually see it… The world is growing more obese and Type 2 Diabetes rates are continuing to grow. All this being sedentary malarkey is not good for our poor gluteal muscles. When we sit, they don’t get used, and when they don’t get used, they get weak! And they have a pretty important role to play, being responsible for several hip movements, helping to keep the pelvis stable when we walk, and allowing you to advance forward when walking, running and jumping. You see, they want to move you! Weakness in these muscles then leads to bio-mechanical changes around the hips (which spills over into the lower back, knees and ankles), and those fundamental movements suddenly become difficult to perform without major compensation and adaptation occurring. And we know what adaptation over long periods can lead to don’t we? That’s right – pain. Good… You’ve been listening!

Some of the effects of weak glutes include hip, knee, low back or heel pain, poor/slouching posture, and a change in the way you walk (your ‘gait’). If you’re a runner, you may even notice an increase in the number of blisters you are getting, due to the change in your running style (of course, you may also need new runners, so worth getting these checked too!).

What should you do?

If you are experiencing hip pain, please come in and see us… We’ll assess you to see where your imbalances are, and what is causing the pain. Whether it’s down to muscular imbalance, weak glutes, or any other cause, we’ll teach you how to put it right and get those glutes firing properly in no time.